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What Do The Designs On My Persian Area Rug Mean?

Have you ever wondered what the motifs (designs) on your Persian area rug convey? Each hand-woven area rug has a story to tell and if you can interpret the symbols woven into your rug, you’ll have a better understanding of your work of art. This week let’s examine what “Protective” motifs look like. Stars, Crosses, Dragons and Other Protective Symbols Protective motifs have a

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Ten Myths About Oriental Rugs You Should Know

As Oriental rug cleaning professionals, appraisers and repair specialists, Oriental Rug Salon is fortunate to be the “cleaner of choice” to many interior designers, rug collectors, and consumers who cherish their hand-woven textiles. When speaking with clients we find they really don’t know anything about the history of their rug.  In most cases, the rug retailer gave them “a little story” about the rug

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Pet Urine Treatment for Oriental, Persian, Turkish, Wool and Silk Area Rugs

Approximately 33% of all Oriental, Persian, Turkish and other wool and silk area rugs Oriental Rug Salon is asked to clean contains pet urine. Pets can wreak havoc on nice rugs, especially when they have accidents. Pet urine, feces and “hairballs” can leave permanent stains and cause dye migration if not addressed quickly. Pet urine can also cause permanent damage to your wool and

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What Is A Hand-Tufted Oriental Area Rug?

A Hand-Tufted Area Rug  The process for creating a hand-tufted rug is drastically different than hand weaving an Oriental, Persian or Turkish area rug. Hand-Tufted area rugs are made by punching strands of wool into a canvas or “cartoon” that is stretched on a frame with the help of a hand-operated tool. This process is not very time-intensive and does not require the same

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Navajo Rugs – America’s Own Hand-Knotted Rug

Navajo rugs and textiles are produced by the Navajo people who live in the four corners area of North America, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. The rugs and textiles were originally for their on practical use, but by the end of the 19th century, Navajo weavers began to produce rugs for tourism and export. Navajo rugs are flat woven on a vertical loom

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